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Dublin Hotels

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Featured Dublin Hotels

Dublin is the Republic of Ireland’s lively capital, an engaging mix of old and new where medieval streets give way to a thriving tech quarter. The city’s museums, monuments and shops draw visitors from around the globe, and its legendary nightlife takes in everything from centuries-old pubs to glitzy late-night clubs.

Dublin: city layout

Compact, walkable Dublin sits on Ireland’s east coast, bisected east to west by the River Liffey. The southern Grand Canal and the northern Royal Canal ring the city.

 

Most major attractions lie south of the river. Towards the east you’ll find Trinity College, from where pedestrianised, shop-lined Grafton Street leads south to St. Stephen’s Green. Further east, Dublin’s tech quarter sits around the Grand Canal Docks. 

 

The Guinness Storehouse is in the west, close to east-west thoroughfare Dame Street. 

 

Pedestrian Ha’penny Bridge links the medieval streets of lively Temple Bar to the Liffey’s north bank. Locals generally refer to the streets running along the riverbank as the North and South Quays.

 

Enormous Phoenix Park, in the northwest, houses a castle, gardens and the Dublin Zoo.

Dublin’s Top Attractions

For the best of old Dublin, start south of the Liffey and take a guided tour of 13th-century St. Patrick’s Cathedral, then tour the grand State Apartments at imposing Dublin Castle. You can wander the cobblestone squares of 16th-century Trinity College, where the ornate Book of Kells is on display in the library.

 

After the 1916 Easter Rising, political prisoners were held at gloomy Kilmainham Gaol, now a museum exploring the history of Ireland’s independence movement. Prehistoric gold jewellery and the intricate, eighth-century Tara Brooch are among the treasures of the National Museum of Ireland’s archaeology collection.

The concierge recommends…

  • A visit to the grand, neoclassical General Post Office, occupied by rebels during the Easter Rising of 1916. Bullet holes can still be glimpsed on the facade of the building.
  • If queuing to see the Book of Kells is too daunting, view the lovely illuminated manuscripts at the Chester Beatty Library instead. Bonus: it’s free.
  • Take time to stroll the lawns and admire the Georgian buildings of pretty Merrion Square.
  • Sink the freshest pint of Guinness you’ve ever tasted at The Gravity Bar on top of the Guinness Storehouse, which has sweeping views of the city.
  • Join the locals cheering on their favourite teams at a football or rugby match at Aviva Stadium.

Hotels in Dublin

IHG offers a wide range of options of hotels for your stay in Dublin, including many in the bustling city centre. The calmer suburbs are further from the action but have quick and convenient public transport links.

 

Minutes from the city centre by bus or DART railway, residential Ballsbridge is known for its wide, tree-lined streets. Many of Dublin’s embassies are found here. Families will appreciate the relative quiet, and kids can run loose in Herbert Park.

 

The suburb of Blanchardstown is a great choice if you’re exploring Ireland by car. It’s just off the M50, 20 minutes by bus from central Dublin, and home to several industrial and business parks.

 

A hotel near Dublin Airport (DUB) is good for business travellers making a quick stop or anyone with an early departure. Nearby, paths wind through the trees and fountains of picturesque Santry Park.

Eating Out in Dublin

Dublin’s restaurants offer a wide choice of international cuisines. The dining scene has heated up in recent years, with young chefs using locally sourced meat, fish and vegetables to create fresh, modern takes on traditional Irish fare.

 

You’ll find the biggest concentration of restaurants south of the Liffey, especially in Temple Bar, with more elegant choices to the south towards St. Stephen’s Green and Merrion Square. Foodies can sample local delicacies on the Dublin Tasting Trail guided tour.

 

With two Michelin stars to brag about, Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud is ideal for a money-no-object feast. At the other end of the budget spectrum, legendary Leo Burdock’s has been serving fish and chips in Christchurch since 1913.

 

Every Saturday, vendors at the Temple Bar Food Market sell everything from local produce and freshly baked bread to sushi and oysters. Street food fans should check out Irish Village Markets, which brings international treats to hungry lunchtime crowds at sites around the city from Tuesday to Friday. 

The chef recommends...

  • Dublin Coddle: Local author Jonathan Swift was said to be a fan of this hearty dish, usually made with potatoes, onions, sausage and bacon.
  • Oysters: Fresh, local oysters are on the can’t-miss list for seafood lovers.
  • Irish Stew: Traditionally made with lamb, root vegetables and onions, though beef and Guinness is another popular variation.
  • Black and White Pudding: Part of a traditional Irish breakfast, these sausages are made of oatmeal, suet, pork and spices. 

Shopping in Dublin

Dublin visitors can shop anywhere from high-end fashion retailers to humble market stalls, scooping up funky vintage accessories, fine jewellery and everything in between.

 

Pedestrianised Grafton Street is Dublin’s best-known shopping area, with high-street shops along the main drag and some quirky finds on the intersecting streets. Cow’s Lane is known for its designer boutiques and hosts a Saturday market for clothing, handmade crafts and jewellery. Francis Street is the place for antiques and collectibles.

 

Posh Powerscourt Centre mixes local and international fashion boutiques with antique shops and restaurants in an elegant Georgian townhouse. Stephen’s Green Shopping Centre has familiar brands in a central location. George’s Street Arcade pulls together a jumble of independent boutiques and stalls in a purpose-built, 19th-century building. 

 

The suburban Blanchardstown Centre, about 20 minutes northwest of Dublin, has around 180 stores, with a cinema and the Leisureplex entertainment complex to keep non-shoppers busy.

Best souvenirs to buy in Dublin

  • A tin whistle: Founded in the 1920s, Waltons Music has played a key role in the publication and distribution of traditional Irish tunes. A whistle and songbook make great souvenirs for music lovers.
  • An Avoca throw: Avoca has been weaving its 100% lambswool throws since the 1700s, but with bright, modern colours, they’re anything but old-fashioned. Their Suffolk Street outpost also has clothing, housewares and a café.
  • Edibles: Take home a taste of Ireland with something as simple as Irish sea salt, or wow your favourite whiskey-lover with a bottle from Jamestown Distillery, complete with custom label.

Culture & Nightlife in Dublin

Packed with bars, clubs and restaurants, Temple Bar is Dublin’s cultural quarter and busiest nightlife area. It can attract a boisterous crowd after dark, but things are calmer in the older, western end of the district. You can catch trad sessions (where musicians drop in to perform Irish folk music) at pubs all over the city.

 

Dublin Writers Museum explores the city’s proud literary history through the possessions, early editions and unpublished writings of such greats as James Joyce, George Bernard Shaw and Samuel Beckett. In September and October the Dublin Theatre Festival presents plays by local and international writers. You can enjoy performances all year-round at the Abbey Theatre and the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre.

 

The National Gallery of Ireland shows European and Irish art from the 13th to the 20th centuries, with a room dedicated to the paintings of Jack B. Yeats. Set in the 17th-century Royal Hospital Kilmainham, the Irish Museum of Modern Art houses the country’s contemporary and modern art collection.

Where to hear trad music in Dublin

  • The Cobblestone is a long-standing, no-frills favourite, with free live music every night.
  • Dating back to 1198, The Brazen Head is about as traditional as it gets. There’s music every night here too, plus a popular Sunday afternoon session.
  • The Tuesday night Folk Club at Whelan’s often features artists who put a modern twist on trad.

Visiting Dublin with a Family

The Irish are a family-friendly lot. Kids are welcome in most places and there are plenty of activities to keep little ones busy.

 

Massive Phoenix Park has a huge area to explore and is home to elephants, tigers and hippos at Dublin Zoo. For a quick play break in the city centre, try the playground at St. Stephen’s Green.

 

Dublinia recreates the sights and sounds of Viking and medieval Dublin with costumed actors and interactive exhibits. On a Viking Splash tour you can view the city from both land and water in a Second World War amphibious vehicle.

Top spots for active families

  • Skerries: The sandy beaches and play areas of this coastal town half an hour’s drive north of Dublin should keep your kids busy.
  • Dublin Mountains: Half an hour’s drive south of the city, and great for a family hike. There are some short trails around the Hell Fire Club, a former hunting lodge with views over Dublin Bay.
  • Aquazone: float in the wave pool and swish down water slides at this high-tech water park, part of the National Aquatic Centre.
  • Fort Lucan Outdoor Adventureland: In spring and summer kids can scramble over towers and suspension bridges at this cool adventure playground. There’s an under-fives’ area, plus go-karts and water slides.

Latest Dublin Hotel Reviews

Average Rating for Dublin Hotel
(4.5 / 5) of 2059 reviews
Comfortable, quiet, and friendly staff.
By John ITD
I only stayed for one night, but appreciated the professional staff. The hotel was clean, quiet, and comfortable. I will stay again, next time I'm in Ireland. [Less]
First time Stay and Park
By matt2303
I got a good rate (€85) for 1 night b b with 5 nights secur eparking which was excellent value. Staff were friendly and room although small enough was spotless. The only downside is the food side of [More] it as we asked was food still being served and were advised it would be best to go to the Crowne Plaza next door (good reccomendation though ) and breakfast was pretty average especially the hot food selection but overall good enough spot that i would reccomend [Less]
Comfortable for one night stay
By segan
Modern and functional, perfectly comfortable for one night stay, but would not be suitable for longer stay - the emphasis is on efficiency - (open hanging rack rather than a closet etc.), no bath and [More] slightly odd bathroom/shower/door configuration. Reasonable choice in included breakfast and friendly staff. [Less]
Great location and excellent staff
By Susie3333
Second time staying here with my family! We loved it and the staff are amazing!! Highly recommend staying here! I hope to book again. Easy access to shops and buses! Food beautiful too!! [Less]
Excellent Room Facilities
By Roy-H
The room even had a Nespresso coffee machine! The bathroom had a large selection of toiletries. The TV had UK and Irish television channels. The Internet was fast and easy to use. The room was [More] huge and came with free drinks vouchers. [Less]
Great stay at another Crowne Plaza
By London_231
I spent 4 days at the Dublin - Blanchardstown Crowne Plaza and it was a very pleasant stay. The staff were very warm and definately the Irish charm was coming through. The breakfast options was [More] quite extensive and fresh. A great start every day for business [Less]
A great placed to stay.
By Mrs S. F
A great placed to stay. The staff were very welcoming and attentive, and the breakfast was excellent!! We stayed as a family and we all had a great time. Very child friendly but would be certainly be [More] a great place to stay as a couple We will certainly be returning [Less]
Unfortunate start but same great quality
By DRooney3
Unfortunately at the start of the trip we had a problem with recpetion but after this we very much enjoyed our stay in the hotel. It was the great quality that we had remembered and we had a great [More] time. Breakfast is just simply a must! [Less]
Excellent Room
By RICKOMG
Fantastic Hotel and services on site. Lacks Atmosphere in the reception / Bar area. Even though the hotel was quite , waiter service was not attentive. [Less]

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